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Montessori programs use special materials that are uniquely designed to encourage the learning process.

We don’t rely on texts or workbooks, but instead employ a range of beautiful, hands-on tools that foster a deep sense of concentration and a curiosity about the world. Many of the materials found in Montessori classrooms seek to teach lessons especially important for young learners, like how to tie a bow or fasten buttons.

Our learning materials are made from a variety of elements, like polished wood or enameled metal, and we like to use items from the natural world in our classrooms such as sea shells and butterflies. These tools have a variety of unique textures and can be used for exploratory activities like sorting.

Our materials appeal to all the senses and encourage children to use their abilities to look, taste, touch, smell, and listen.

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Presentation of Montessori Toys

This is part two of “Montessori Toys.” In case you missed it, here is Part I.

Presentation of Montessori Toys

Playtime is about more than just having a big pile of toys for a child to sort through. Even if they are wonderful toys, they need to be presented to a child in a way that he/she can fully appreciate the toy.

Storing Toys

Storing Montessori ToysWe recommend that toys are stored on neutral colored toy shelves because they offer the possibility of displaying a toy in such a way that it attracts and lures the child to it.

Each toy should be washed often and have all of its parts. If a toy is difficult to store or keep neatly on the shelf, make an attractive box for it.

Each toy that has removable parts should have a beautiful small box for the storage of those parts.

Keep it Fresh! – The art of rotating toys:

Toy rotation results in better use of toys. This way, children always feel that some of their toys are “new.” Limit the number of toys on the shelves to 8 or 9 at any one time. Remaining toys should be stored accessibly.

As the child tires of certain toys they can replace them with a stored toy. Of course, if a child asks for a “stored toy,” he/she should be able to have it.

Putting toys away

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Montessori philosophy believes that choosing toys in a Montessori home should challenge a child’s interest and imagination, without being too difficult or too easy.

If your child destroys a toy, it is often because the toy is either too simple, too difficult, or is in a deteriorated condition. Toys should inspire a sense of joy, wonder or fulfillment as a child plays with them. (Of course, first and foremost, toys should be safe!)

Types of toys

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